Prometheus stared bleakly into the night feeling only a sense of dread. He’d long since lost his emotional attachment to anything in this hard world. He’d lost count of how long he’d been chained to the peak of the Caucasus Mountains. Generations, come and gone. Freedom, a distant memory.

His days were a living nightmare, the black of night his only reprieve. He’d known Zeus should not be crossed, but hadn’t realised the depth of his anger, that Zeus would have him bound to this rock for an eternity of agonising torture. But he should have. 

That didn’t matter anymore either. What mattered was that mankind had thrived. He’d seen it from his mountain peak and could cope with his torture in the knowledge that man had learnt well how to use the fire he had stolen for them. They’d manipulated it to their advantage and only gained in strength and ability.

He spotted Eosphoros, the Dawn Star, in the distant sky and knew that his mother, Eos, would soon rise from the sea in her chariot. Her horses would shake the water from their wings before soaring into the sky, from where Eos would dispense the morning dew.

His stomach clenched in dread as the sky on the eastern horizon lightened. He heard the cry of the approaching eagle and the beat of his great wings echoed around the mountains in the receding night. Ethon, the mighty Caucasian Eagle would, once more, land before him, tear at his flesh and eat his liver before his eyes. He readied himself to close down his mind, block out the pain. He would weep no more.

Suddenly, he became aware of a new sound. A twang, followed by a whoosh of air in front of his face, repeated again and again. He opened his eyes to see a volley of arrows pass before him and, with a scream, Ethon fell from the sky, never to rise again.

This was a morning for strange sensations, this one a gentle hand upon his shoulder. “Come Prometheus,” said Heracles, “It’s time that you came home.”

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Voice-Team
Voice-Team(@voice-team)
Admin
1 year ago

A brilliant new rendering of an old myth. How wonderful to include Greek mythology in your excellent stories!

Genya Johnson
Genya Johnson(@genya-johnson)
1 year ago

I love Greek mythology and you have captured this story beautifully.

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Linda Rock
Linda Rock(@linda-rock)
1 year ago

I think you know Carrie that I have little knowledge of Greek mythology which is one of the reasons I love your stories so much. This is beautifully written and opens up a new world to me. You’ve expressed the pain and torment of Prometheus so well and the ending brought me a deep sense of relief. More please.

Greene M Wills
Greene M Wills(@greene-m-wills)
1 year ago

I have always wondered if Prometheus was the fire-bringer or the fire-stealer. Were his motives so pure if Zeus was so enraged? Your story portraits his torment perfectly, the eons passing as if on speed-camera, the resignation to his fate is pure sadness. I imagine him stunned and unbelieving when his freedom finally arrives. Your story had brought all these pictures to my mind, I simply loved it!

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Eric Radcliffe
Eric Radcliffe(@eric-radcliffe)
1 year ago

Nice write Carrie.

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Christer Norrlof
Christer Norrlof(@christer-norrlof)
1 year ago

Thanks for enlightening us about the world of the Greek Gods, Carrie. Your story is fascinating and educational. Who knows what it really meant that Prometheus brought fire (which also represented civilization/knowledge) to humans and why he was so severely punished for it? Could it have a connection with the Christian mythology with Adam and Eve getting forever thrown out of “Paradise” for having acquired knowledge? (Which Andrew Carter writes about in his Dawn-story.) It might be that human, logical thinking is what keeps us from understanding eternity and feeling the presence of God/Paradise.

Juma
Juma(@juma)
1 year ago

You make the Prometheus myth come alive, Carrie. What a gift you have for descriptive detail. We can feel his hopelessness, which makes his rescue all the more thrilling. I love the sweetness of the last line. Even the Gods long for home. Congratulations on a greatly deserved win!

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Katy Bizi
Katy Bizi(@katy-bizi)
1 year ago

Congratulations, Carrie. It was an honor to see Greek Mythology interlock with the theme of Dawn. Well done!

Linda Rock
Linda Rock(@linda-rock)
1 year ago

Congratulations Carrie, well deserved. I’m so pleased for you.

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Genya Johnson
Genya Johnson(@genya-johnson)
1 year ago

Well done and congratulations on your great achievement. You must be feeling so proud. I loved this story.

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Eric Radcliffe
Eric Radcliffe(@eric-radcliffe)
1 year ago

Well done Carrie on being runner up. I’m sure everyone enjoyed your story as much as I did. Eric.

Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo(@lotchie-carmelo)
1 year ago

Thank you for taking us to the world of the Greek God. It is old mythology yet still very interesting.

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Fuji
Fuji(@fuji)
Reply to  Carrie OLeary
1 year ago

And you, Carrie are just the right person to retell them. Can’t wait for your next one!

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Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo(@lotchie-carmelo)
Reply to  Carrie OLeary
1 year ago

Congratulations, Carrie.

Emily O'Leary
Emily O'Leary(@emily-oleary)
1 year ago

Fabulous reading on this one ❤ I love stories surrounding Greek mythology and you definitely do it justice!

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