I long ago became a master of acceptance when it came to Isaiah.

There had been signs such as missed milestones and delayed speech. He formed quirks; I was unable to understand at the time, but in the years that have since passed I have come to cherish them. He struggles socially but is a whiz kid in mathematics, especially awe-inspiring in geometry.

If I wear certain shapes on my being it allows him to express thoughts and feelings more openly. When he becomes inundated with particular social situations, he will use geometry to quell his stress.

Enough of that woolgathering. It’s important to have a schedule to adhere to…Isaiah depends on it to feel safe in the predictability of his home.

Isaiah came downstairs in the morning at the sure-fire time of 7:15 am. Unexpectedly I dropped my coffee cup on the floor; it was cacophonous, and it startled him. Pieces of ceramic bestrewed across the floor; I then erroneously released an expletive from my lips. My son looked at me and blurted out, “Stop! You’re firing triangles into the air, cold, icy triangles!”

“Isaiah, I’m sorry. I just broke my coffee cup.” His eyes focused on my sphere-shaped earrings.

“It’s OK, mother, your sweeping of the floor is now focused circles.” His calm tone spilled out of him, onto me. Sudden thoughts left my clean up at a standstill.

Is it strange for him to live in a geometric world? Perhaps not. I stand in front of him on a cubic tiled floor, I drink out of my globular cup. This is something he could always count on.

He inspires in youth a sense of possibility and in me a sense of greenness because he views the world with a different set of eyes. He’s contentedly home in his triangular-quadrate-spherical world.  I’m simply happy to report that his mother fits squarely in it.

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Linda Rock
Linda Rock (@linda-rock)
7 months ago

We all view the world with a different set of eyes but your story enabled me to enter the world of Isaiah and, just for a while, see it through his eyes. I read your story twice Melissa, because to experience such a world is very special. Beautifully written in the voice of a mother whose love and understanding shines through.

Fuji
Fuji (@fuji)
7 months ago

Incredible story, Melissa. Rather than tell us about Isaiah’s world, you’ve invited us in, with love and appreciation. I have a young friend, almost 40 years my junior, who defines her world through geometry and through classical music. When she was very young, she was labelled autistic, but she didn’t fit any labels. She has created her own world, and, as a rising senior in college now, is redefining the definition of success!

Carrie OLeary
Carrie OLeary (@carrie-oleary)
7 months ago

Great story Melissa, and easy to see that it comes from some level of experience. Humans are very good at adapting and finding their own way of fitting in and coping with the world. You demonstrated this beautifully and in a very sensitive way.

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Eric Radcliffe
Eric Radcliffe (@eric-radcliffe)
7 months ago

Hi Melissa, I think you said it all when you said – “does not fit in any label squarely” in your reply. I do not know why we have to label that which is different. Just wouldn’t the world be a better place if we just loved the differences in people. You brought this out in the story beautifully. Well written Melissa ?

Brigitta Hegyi
Brigitta Hegyi (@brigitta-hegyi)
7 months ago

Being unique is the best thing. Kids like Isaiah can teach adults how to accept someone who is different. Lovely story!

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Jess Maynard
Jess Maynard (@jess-maynard)
7 months ago

I love stories that give insight into various perspectives on the world. It’s incredible how the human mind interprets sensory data in so many different ways. I really enjoyed your story!

Sandra James
Sandra James (@sandra-james)
7 months ago

Lovely, Melissa! A wonderful insight into the lives of special children, and their mothers. I think you turned a very good story into a great story with that closing sentence. Well done!

Christer Norrlof
Christer Norrlof (@christer-norrlof)
6 months ago

This is a wonderfully told story, Melissa. It is very educating for us who lack this experience. I love the patient, accepting and open minded attitude of the mother. It gives Isaiah a safe ground to grow from.

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Alan Kemister
Alan Kemister (@alan-kemister)
6 months ago

Beautifully done. So many children, even ones not diagnosed as having autism, have trouble fitting in and come up with their own way of coping. This story using geometry as its focus shows how a mother and her son can make it work. It also gave you an opportunity to work in lots of synonyms for squares triangles and circles. I thought quadrate was interesting. That’s a term usually associated with heraldry. I hadn’t seen it used outside that context.

Dipayan Chakrabarti
Dipayan Chakrabarti (@dipayan-chakrabarti)
6 months ago

The world of children living with autism is beautifully portrayed to evoke the milk of kindness in the reader.

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Dipayan Chakrabarti
Dipayan Chakrabarti (@dipayan-chakrabarti)
6 months ago

You’re welcome, Melissa.

Katy Bizi
Katy Bizi (@katy-bizi)
6 months ago

This is a quite beautiful story, Melissa, a real treat to read. I utterly enjoyed every sentence!

Katy Bizi
Katy Bizi (@katy-bizi)
6 months ago

You’re very welcome!
And it’s really interesting to hear what the writer really feels.

Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo (@lotchie-carmelo)
4 months ago

Wow. I love it, Melissa. Great story.

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Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo (@lotchie-carmelo)
4 months ago

 ?  You’re welcome.

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