I’d passed many trials; the memories though, almost too painful to bear.

Now, the final trial. I’m in a stark white room. No furniture, no windows. Two white doors materialise, each sporting a silver handle.

“Choose,” said the voice, the one that had been with me throughout the trials.

“Where do they go?”

“One will return you to the beginning, a chance to do it all again, correct your mistakes, a chance for redemption. The other will take you to a place of eternal judgement. Choose.”

I take a deep breath, cross to a door, turn the handle and push…

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Eric Radcliffe
Eric Radcliffe(@eric-radcliffe)
1 year ago

Hi Carrie, you are nearer to the truth than you can imagine. How many times do we still make the same mistakes? Nice story for all to ponder on.

Linda Rock
Linda Rock(@linda-rock)
1 year ago

I agree with Eric, Carrie, how often do we make the same mistakes? But we can’t change who we are. However, to get the chance to correct our mistakes, who wouldn’t want that? A thought provoking story, well done.

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Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo(@lotchie-carmelo)
1 year ago

What a nice story, Carrie. I agree with Eric and Linda, we always do the same mistakes all over again because we are just human and born unperfect or imperfect. We cannot change who we are but we can decide what we want to be and we can correct all our mistakes from the past. I hope your protagonist will choose the right door.

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Julie Harris
Julie Harris(@julie-harris)
Reply to  Carrie OLeary
1 year ago

This is such an interesting idea, Carrie. Perhaps we learn lessons without remembering the details, and could therefore make better choices from instinct, if not from direct knowledge. Once, many decades ago, I received a slight electrical shock while standing at a kitchen sink. Even now sometimes, without directly remembering that incident, I experience fear while running water into the sink. It was a learned response, without the memory. It does kind of make the brain hurt a bit to think about it ? Great story, food for thought.

Dipayan Chakrabarti
Dipayan Chakrabarti(@dipayan-chakrabarti)
1 year ago

Hello Carrie,
This is an entertaining yet thiught-provoking story

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Dipayan Chakrabarti
Dipayan Chakrabarti(@dipayan-chakrabarti)
Reply to  Carrie OLeary
1 year ago

You’re welcome.

Christer Norrlof
Christer Norrlof(@christer-norrlof)
1 year ago

A good story, like this one, has the potential to stir up thoughts and reactions in the reader. I agree with other commentators, and you, that your story makes one wonder about life and death, difficulties and possibilities of making things right. My thought went to the movie Groundhog Day, where the protagonist finally got it right. And then I am wondering if we are in that situation of choice every day and in every meeting with each one of our co-humans.

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Marianna Pieterse
Marianna Pieterse(@marianna-pieterse)
1 year ago

Carrie, that is such a tough decision for your protagonist to make! Like Eric said, we so often make the same mistakes. I hope your protagonist chooses the correct door!

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Marianna Pieterse
Marianna Pieterse(@marianna-pieterse)
Reply to  Carrie OLeary
1 year ago

Carrie, absolutely! This makes me grateful for each opportunity I get daily to make the right choices now, and for chances to rectify mistakes now. Your story is really thought provoking.

Emily O'Leary
Emily O'Leary(@emily-oleary)
1 year ago

As everyone else has said, it does make you wonder! If we were to go back would we make different choices? And how would that affect who we grew to be? You could be a very different person indeed if you went back and chose differently! I wonder how many of us would take that risk?

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