Niamh shyly touched the stranger’s robe, overcome with astonishment.

“Blue,” Cian said gently. Niamh did not know the word, nor the color, nor any color except grey.

The old men muttered, the women huddled together. But the children were curious.

“Come, see.” Cian led them to the massive steel door which had not been opened in hundreds of years, since the floods, the blistering heat, the scorching wildfires. They froze, terrified.

“It’s safe now. Nature has healed the wounds.”

He opened the door to a miraculous world of fragrance and texture, color and light.

Niamh tentatively took the first step.

5 1 vote
Post Rating
Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
21 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Carrie OLeary
Carrie OLeary(@carrie-oleary)
1 year ago

I love this Julie. Beautifully written, it feels so expectant and hopeful. Very nicely done!

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Linda Rock
Linda Rock(@linda-rock)
1 year ago

I am in awe Julie. I love the gentleness of the narrative leading to the child’s awakening. The image you’ve used is truly beautiful.

Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo(@lotchie-carmelo)
1 year ago

I agree with Carrie, Julie. It feels so hopeful. Like as I hope that nature will heal the scarcity that COVID 19 brought to us. I also love this, Julie. Very nice story. Great job.

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo(@lotchie-carmelo)
Reply to  Julie Harris
1 year ago

You’re welcome, Julie. Yes, there is hope. 

Fuji
Fuji(@fuji)
1 year ago

A gentle story, as Linda noted, but sad that it might take hundreds of years to bring back what we should never have taken for granted. I hope we can change our ways now, and not be locked in a steel bunker for centuries!

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Fuji
Fuji(@fuji)
Reply to  Julie Harris
1 year ago

A question, Julie. I tried reading your story out loud to a friend, but I don’t know how to pronounce the little girls name. Could you help me with that?

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Fuji
Fuji(@fuji)
Reply to  Julie Harris
1 year ago

Thanks, Julie. Those pronunciations add another dimension to the story, and also help me read it aloud.

Sandra James
Sandra James(@sandra-james)
1 year ago

A beautiful story, Julie, a gentle reminder and full of hope. Nature is a wonderful healer and, if we can encourage a few more to work with her, such a miracle might happen before our descendants are forced into that grey world. Well done  ? 

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Christer Norrlof
Christer Norrlof(@christer-norrlof)
1 year ago

At the same time an optimistic and pessimistic take on our environmental situation, Julie. Your story is very well written with many small, important details thrown in. I love it that it is the children that are open to the new situation, while the old people are skeptic. While reading it, my mind went to Plato and his story about the prisoners in the cave. Do you know it?

Christer Norrlof
Christer Norrlof(@christer-norrlof)
Reply to  Julie Harris
1 year ago

Julie, I have tried to figure out what you are trying to tell us about those names, but sorry to say I am at a loss. This is all I can come up with: From Niamh/Neeve I can make associations to “never”, to “knee” or to Spanish “nieve”, meaning snow. From Cían/Kee-an, I associate to “keen”, to “can” or to the biblical name Kain with all its implications. It will be interesting to see what other readers come up with. This is as far as my little brain can take me.

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Lyric The Great
Lyric The Great(@lyric-the-great)
1 year ago

Despite the fact that there aren’t many words, this story is overall beautiful, and I think you’ve done an amazing job here!

Comments without a personalized avatar will not be published.
Become a PatronHelp support our family-friendly mission

Recent Comments



21
0
Selected Authors may submit comments (5 Credits)x
()
x
Scroll to Top

Sharing a Post

Why do my friends need to SignIn to read the post I shared?

Actually, this is a voting security feature. During public voting, only club members can read posts submitted for that contest. Since anyone reading the story is able to vote (click the Like button), we reserve these capabilities to members who SignIn. Before we implemented this security feature, people were voting multiple times and making the public voting process unfair and out of balance. To fix this, our staff finally decided to allow only members who SignIn to read the stories. Membership is free and easy, and ensures our club is safe, secure, and family-friendly!