The views of our hikes always compensated for the flaws of the week.  We could see the ocean water gracefully crashing into the reef at a distance.  The brother mountains bowing down as we sat at the top of mother mountain.  I would trace the outline of the mountains with my finger memorizing each stroke and shade of color for my attempt on canvas I would do after each hike.

“Don’t blame nature,” he would preach to me after I explain to him how this week´s painting differed from the last.

“I just don’t get it,” I said as I nodded my head in disapproval.

“I think your attempt to tame nature in one painting is elusive. Change is the only constant.”

“Just like you.” He rubbed his thumb on my chin. “You are God´s art, but it would be an insult if I said you are the same person as you were last week. We all change, our perception changes.  Be courageous and embrace those changes you can and cannot see. “

That was 5 years ago.  That was before I turned legally blind.

My mind was in a dark abyss. I felt unworthy of many things including my husband and painting.

One day, we both decided to hike. As our feet rumbled through the autumn leaves, I heard twigs breaking and birds chirping. The ocean´s saltiness diffused in the air, the sound of the waves echoed through my ears.  I was reminded that I wasn´t alone as my husband gently grabbed my index finger with his hand, swinging my finger in the air gracefully- up, down, zig-zag… I understood.

“Are we painting?” I asked curiously.

His silence was his fear of my reaction.

“Can we continue?  Show me what´s out on the ocean.” He placed a brush in my hand, and I held it tightly. His warm sweaty hand guiding my wrist, as we both painted in the air.

“Can we go buy some canvas after this?”, I asked softly.

I couldn´t see it, but I knew he was smiling.

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Eric Radcliffe
Eric Radcliffe(@eric-radcliffe)
2 years ago

Sabrina – you paint your words, your story becomes a picture in itself. I was drawn in by the subtleness, the gentle sweetness in the flow of the story. I felt as though I was part of the story. You did what we all try to do, react with the reader – Thank You.

Last edited 2 years ago by Eric Radcliffe
Carrie OLeary
Carrie OLeary(@carrie-oleary)
2 years ago

Your story really touched me. I’m a retired nurse and once looked after a lady who had gone blind in later life. She too used to be an artist and described to me how she kept a palette in her mind so she could paint pictures in her imagination. I actually wrote a short poem about it last year (not that it’s very good!), her story still inspires me all these years later. I think it helped me to relate to your story even more.

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musing mind
musing mind(@musing-mind)
2 years ago

Story written so well. Loved the fluidity in your writing.

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Sandra James
Sandra James(@sandra-james)
2 years ago

Your story really touched me, Sabrina, and reminded me to be grateful for all the things I have and can do. I often wish I could paint or draw but for someone who has such a gift and for it to be taken away must be very, very difficult. I loved the way you built your story, feeling her gradually losing her sight, then step by step finding new joy. I, too, smiled at the end 🙂

Susan Dawson
Susan Dawson(@susan-dawson)
2 years ago

Wow. I am sure the painting would have a wonderful fluidity. An artist with a gallery in these parts does loads of seascapes of the type that I feel your artist would do, although he is wheelchair bound, not blind.

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Lotchie Carmelo
Lotchie Carmelo(@lotchie-carmelo)
1 year ago

I really feel the emotion of this story. I was touched, it sparks, I feel it. You did paint your story into my heart. And I loved this phrase, “Be courageous and embrace those changes you can and cannot see.” You love and embrace all that you have and that inspires me more.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lotchie Carmelo
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